Archive for the ‘tagging’ Category

BBC solicits YouTubers’ footage

May 29, 2007

The BBC’s Andrew Marr is asking YouTubers to upload their own archive footage from the 1950s to 1990s to a YouTube group complementing his History of Modern Britain TV series.

I’m delighted to see the Beeb embracing YouTube as a way of connecting with an existing user community, not just relying on its own massive web presence, and this project plays to YouTube’s strengths. To date, only four videos have been submitted, but this surely has potential to get those dusty cine reels down from the nation’s attics and out to an appreciative audience.

I am looking forward to the eventual release of the BBC iPlayer, which should begin a major change in BBC viewing habits. Perhaps the next generation BBC download tool will incorporate upload, so that we can contribute in the same space as we consume video. More likely, where online won’t matter anymore, as the tagging paradigm takes off and opens a universe of content from all sources to communities such as this one interested in modern British history.

By the way, I love Andrew Marr’s unselfconscious emphasis on substance, not vacuous style.

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Questions for the candidates by public poll

May 27, 2007

I like Jeff Jarvis’ prezconference idea for tagging YouTube videos offering questions for the ’08 candidates. As he suggests, it needs developing to maximise its usefulness, and to provide a clear, simple system for presenting the “best” questions online, so that candidates will be more encouraged to respond.

I had an idea to build a site enabling up/down voting of all videos submitted to YouTube with the prezconference tag (I envisaged pulling in the content using the tag’s RSS feed, and enabling voting, possibly using the Drupal vote up/down package).

Now I realise that David Colarusso has made a start on the concept. It’s early days yet, but this is a good way for the community to bring attention to the questions that most voters want answered, and to marginalize the spammers/navel-gazers.

Clearly the concept would get more attention – and be harder for the candidates to ignore – if voting were integrated within YouTube, but I encourage you to support Colarusso’s effort. If politicians are to embrace web video as a way truly to interact with the public, we will need a straightforward way to present our questions. This is a decent start. Well done, David!